How to Make Armenian Coffee





This is something very near and dear to my heart. I'm half Armenian and although the Mexican half often takes over, I am so proud to learn and make Armenian dishes whenever I can. This is something I HAD to master because coffee is everything to an Armenian.

I also found that Armenians absolutely love pastries and it is common to go to an Armenian's house and be offered (sometimes forced) sweet treats and coffee. 

So, this is Being Armenian 101 class. I have to master Armenian coffee (sometimes grudgingly called Turkish coffee). That way when people come over I can force them to eat freshly baked pastries and drink coffee. 

Haha, no I would never force you. Don't worry.

When I made Jewish Hamantaschen with my friend on IG live, I figured this was the perfect opportunity to break out the middle eastern looking decor- the Michael Aram designer coffee pot and hand-painted cup set from Armenia.

The result was a really happy mom. I admit she is often dominated by my dad's Mexican side. This was a great way to celebrate our culture and eat (Jewish) pastries together. haha

Here we go. 

How to Make Armenian Coffee

Ingredients (for one or two): 

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 heaping teaspoon Armenian, Turkish or Greek coffee (ground more fine than espresso powder. I often use Loumidis Greek coffee in a green package)
  • 1 tsp sugar (optional)

Equipment

  • Small coffee pot (Jezve)
  • Espresso cups

Directions: 

1. Place water and coffee in the pot together (add sugar if using). On a high heat, bring to a boil. It will foam up quickly after a couple minutes, so watch it. Once it foams, take it off the heat immediately. 

2. To serve, spoon some foam into the cup first (in Armenian the word "foam" translates to "love" so make sure to serve the love). Then, pour the coffee into the cup and serve. Make sure you and your guests don't drink to the bottom. The grains remain the cup and are not to be eaten or drank. Fortune tellers actually "read" the coffee grains, but that's not the reason you don't drink them. It just gets into your teeth and it scares people. 

See short video to see how its made and the tools used. 








A post shared by Chef Joanna’s Kitchen (@chefjoannas) on



Comment with Facebook

Comments